5 Challenges of Being an Introverted Blogger

Introverts who want to be bloggers face a unique set of challenges. In many cases, they end up giving up – simply because they don’t know how to deal with these obstacles, and it proves to much for the delicate introvert mind.

Here are 5 specific challenges faced by introverted bloggers:

1. Everyone expects you to behave like an extrovert.

Most of the blogging advice out there comes from extroverts – or people telling you to behave like an extrovert. I mean, really…

Telling an introvert to “get out there on social media?”

That’s like telling someone who is allergic to bees to become a beekeeper, right?

Or like telling someone who is overly sensitive to sunlight, to “get out into the sun – it will get better”…

Yeah, right.

For the introverted blogger, even having to deal with comments on his or her blog can be physically and emotionally exhausting – hence the fact that there are no comments on this blog.

And yes, some will say that it means it isn’t a blog. But that’s ok, I’m not talking to them…:)

Essentially, everybody seems to be telling the introverted aspiring blogger that he or she has to be an extrovert to run a blog – or at least behave like one.

Really? I dare to challenge that rule.

2. There is just so much “noise”…

When behaving in a typical extrovert blogger fashion, the introvert has to deal with much more “noise” than he or she can withstand. As soon as you declare you are a blogger, you are inundated with social media messages trying to “teach you how to use social media”, or “teach you how to blog”…

Besides the fact that it wastes a lot of valuable time, it places a load of unnecessary emotional strain on the introverted mind.

5 Challenges of Being an Introverted Blogger - blogging tips - the Introvert Blogger3. The “typical activities” you should be doing, simply “isn’t you.”

As an introvert, most of the “normal” blogging activities simply don’t appeal to you. In fact, you probably find them downright unpleasant, and having to do it every day is simply unsustainable.

If you are afraid of heights, you will never enjoy climbing a mountain – not matter how beautiful the view from the top may be. Yes, through pushing your limits you may be able to climb a bit higher than you normally would have, but reaching the peak would be a terrifying experience.

Instead of being able to enjoy the view, you would have to deal with the feeling of “I’m going to fall.”

(I know – I have to deal with a fear of heights myself)

4. It’s draining to do it “the normal way.”

Let’s face it – us introverts are just not hard-wired for constant social interaction. While some of us are able to do it, it leaves us feeling drained and unable to perform optimally afterwards.

That, in turn, has a direct effect on your productivity and creativity. Remember that stress tends to shut down the creative centers in the brain (the primitive “fight or flight” mode shuts down rational thought, and fires up the instinct – and social interaction is a stressful activity for an introvert).

No wonder most introverts have a tough time sustaining their blogging activities…

5. You are frowned upon for “not taking action.”

Most of the information on blogging out there has been crafted for extroverts. After all, blogging is an “extrovert activity”, right? In order to get better at this blogging stuff, you enroll in a course to learn more. And then you find yourself unable to implement most of what is thrown at you…

And of course, with the presenter not being geared up to deal with introverts, he or she blames it on you, because you didn’t take action.

You can’t blame him/her, though. They aren’t psychologists, so we can’t expect them to comprehend what it’s like. And we definitely can’t expect them to guide us – not if they don’t even understand what it’s like to be an introvert.

But I do…

As a fellow introvert, I tried doing my share of “against the grain” activities. I tried to figure out why everything I tried, failed.

And I’m not even a full-on introvert – just 80%.

Only once I realized what I am, and why everything seemed as it was, could I go back to the drawing board to see what will work for me.

Needless to say, I do thing a bit differently now.